Archive for the ‘media sales’ Category

Big Desk

August 14, 2017

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It’s an attitude that’s everywhere … and one that needs to stop. Especially in the advertising business.

Big Desk.

You know these people and you’ve seen it in their body language. You’ve heard it in their tone of voice. A “Big Desk” attitude is showing up to the meeting with that “I’m here because I know everything you need to be successful and I’m gracing you with my presence because I’m so busy and important but I’ll make a little time to try and help you.”

I remember the ad girl who was chastised BY THE CLIENT for endlessly checking her phone instead of listening in their meeting.

The young ad novice who leaned back in his chair, laced his fingers behind his head, looked up at the ceiling and said, “Well, Mr. Smith, we’re here to help you.”

Then there’s the client who used to work for our agency. We were calling on him. In his sharply pressed new suit, he sat down behind his desk in dramatic fashion, brought his hands together and said in a steely tone, “What do you think you can do for my company?”   As his former boss, if I could have fired him right then and there, I would have. (By the way, he didn’t last long in that job.)

Whether you’re buying or selling, arrogance isn’t a good quality and there’s a lot of it in the ad world. Advertising is not a “one and done” business. Relationships are vital because trust is everything. Trust solidifies your business. Trust takes time to build. In my 32+ years of small market ad work, I built my business by spending time with my clients and learned what kind of people they were. I tried to anticipate what they needed and give them solutions to the problems they faced. And most importantly, I did it sincerely because I gave a damn. In the process, many of them became close friends. Even better.

A real winner in the ad business doesn’t come across as a used car salesman. Being sincere, genuine and vested doesn’t cost a thing. Take that extra step to make your relationship extraordinary, even if it means losing a buck or two.

Besides, Big Desk is just plain rude.

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She’s bossy. And has an answer for everything.

June 17, 2017

Yup. Guilty as charged.

During my time as a media sales rep for a small town radio station, (my first real job) my manager got a call from the owner of a Mexican fast food chain. He demanded I be replaced with someone else.

Why?

“Because she’s bossy and has an answer for everything”, he said. My manager replied. “I understand. I’ll get you a new rep. But I need to ask you, if she doesn’t have an answer to all your questions, who will?”

She had my back for several reasons. A) I had the client spending a ton of money on our radio station B) I was one of the top sales people at the station C) I genuinely wanted clients get to results D) The client was right. I was bossy.  I still am.

In over 35 years of advertising and sales experience, this guy was the only one (at least that I know of) that ever complained about my approach. Others have described me as “nice-bossy”. I have always pushed for my ideas but in the end, the client gets to do what they want.

You get to be “bossy” when A) You demonstrate that you genuinely give a damn B) You have formed a real relationship with the client that has established trust C) You know EXACTLY what you’re talking about and can back up your claims with facts that give you the ability to have the answer “for everything”.

And what if you get asked something you don’t have an answer for?  You say:  I don’t have that answer right now, but I will find out and get back to you.

No matter how big the client is, they need and want direction and leadership. They don’t want another order taker. You’re getting paid to deliver results and ideas. If you can’t demonstrate real enthusiasm for a client’s success, even if it comes down to being a bit bossy (in a nice way), then you need to find another way to earn a living.   Like working the cash register at the Mexican restaurant.

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